About

I received my Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

I am currently both a Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and Izaak Walton Killam Postdoctoral Fellow at Dalhousie University.

My research examines science, medicine, and illness. I maintain two interconnected lines of research:

My first line of research addresses how science impacts medical practices and health. My published research on this topic analyzes how science influences suffering (see forthcoming article in Social Problems), how mental disorders are classified (see article in Journal of Health and Social Behavior), and how disciplinary silos facilitate misdiagnosis (see article in Social Science & Medicine).

My second line of research addresses how people live with illnesses. My published research on this topic analyzes how people living with a fatal illness perceive suicide (see article in Journal of Death and Dying), how hegemonic masculinity influences men's health practices (see article in American Journal of Men's Health), and how gender relates to informal health care work (see article in Social Science & Medicine)

My current research investigates how emerging brain science alters the definition of illnesses, the production of research, and the application of medical treatments. This research is the basis for a developing book manuscript.

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My research employs multiple methods, including in-depth interviews (see article in Journal of Health and Social Behavior) ethnographic observations (see article in American Journal of Men's Health), and content analysis (see article in Sociology of Health & Illness). I have also collaborated with quantitative researchers on mixed-methods research (see article in Health Care for Women International).

I have participated on projects funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. I have also pursued interdisciplinary collaborations, working with with nurses, psychiatrists, oncologists, anesthesiologists, social workers, psychiatrists, and psychologists.

I previously served as a student representative for the American Sociological Association's Section on Science, Knowledge and Technology.

 

Contact:

mahalpin@wisc.edu